About Mater

Mater is a conscious and ethical design brand with a strong design philosophy and great craftsmanship. Through collaborations with an external base of established and fresh design talent, Mater combines exclusive high-end furniture and lighting, with working methods that support people, local craft traditions and the environment. The aesthetic of Mater has clear references to Scandinavian minimalism and the designs are all made with sustainably or ethically sourced materials.

Designed for both commercial and residential use, Mater strive to avoid and minimise any adverse impact on society, by following ethical and sustainable production criteria and creating products that will both stand the test of time and inspire the consumer to cherish and savour them.

The comarché framework

Product lifecycle

Brand sustainability

Mater is a conscious and ethical design brand that combines high-end furniture and lighting with working methods that support people, local craft traditions and the environment.

Mater doesn’t focus on what they launch but rather they define why products are launched, in an ethical context. Mater cares about the ethical choice behind the material in their products and renewable, certified wood, recycled waste and new efficient energy sources are Mater’s inspiration. They explore materials and production methods that are environmentally friendly without compromising aesthetics. Through partnerships with master artisans, Mater generates designs that last a lifetime and age beautifully.

Mater has a clear ambition to inspire consumer behaviour and engage people in sustainable thinking, making design matter and reducing the consumer’s footprint. It all comes down to the fact Mater cares about using resources responsibly, implementing or motivating sustainable business principles throughout the value chain. They demand that committed production partners are properly certified, and are now afraid to draw attention to the reality that ALL products are associated with environmental, ethical and social consequences.

Mater also believes that corporate sustainability starts with a company’s value system and a principled approach to doing business. This means operating in ways that meet fundamental responsibilities in areas of human rights, labor, environment and anti-corruption.

Brand Ethos

Anything and everything is included in Mater’s approch to doing business as sustainably minded as possible. On both brand level, in terms of social sustainability and throughout the entire product life cycle, sustainability has been taken into account. Most recently, Mater has ventured into innovative partnerships with big organisations in order to utilise their trash for creating new products.  They are, in fact, changing an industry which is why we label them as a Hero brand.

The Comarché Notes

Look out for Mater’s newest partnerships with bigger Danish organisations. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure!

UN’s Sustainable Development Goals

Goal 7: Affordable and clean energy image Goal 7: Affordable and clean energy

Between 2000 and 2016, the number of people with electricity increased from 78 to 87 percent, and the numbers without electricity dipped to just below one billion.

Yet as the population continues to grow, so will the demand for cheap energy, and an economy reliant on fossil fuels is creating drastic changes to our climate.

Investing in solar, wind and thermal power, improving energy productivity, and ensuring energy for all is vital if we are to achieve SDG 7 by 2030.

Expanding infrastructure and upgrading technology to provide clean and more efficient energy in all countries will encourage growth and help the environment.

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Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth image Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Over the past 25 years the number of workers living in extreme poverty has declined dramatically, despite the lasting impact of the 2008 economic crisis and global recession. In developing countries, the middle class now makes up more than 34 percent of total employment – a number that has almost tripled between 1991 and 2015.

However, as the global economy continues to recover we are seeing slower growth, widening inequalities, and not enough jobs to keep up with a growing labour force. According to the International Labour Organization, more than 204 million people were unemployed in 2015.

The SDGs promote sustained economic growth, higher levels of productivity and technological innovation. Encouraging entrepreneurship and job creation are key to this, as are effective measures to eradicate forced labour, slavery and human trafficking. With these targets in mind, the goal is to achieve full and productive employment, and decent work, for all women and men by 2030.

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Goal 9: Industry, innovation and infrastructure image Goal 9: Industry, innovation and infrastructure

Investment in infrastructure and innovation are crucial drivers of economic growth and development. With over half the world population now living in cities, mass transport and renewable energy are becoming ever more important, as are the growth of new industries and information and communication technologies.

Technological progress is also key to finding lasting solutions to both economic and environmental challenges, such as providing new jobs and promoting energy efficiency. Promoting sustainable industries, and investing in scientific research and innovation, are all important ways to facilitate sustainable development.

More than 4 billion people still do not have access to the Internet, and 90 percent are from the developing world. Bridging this digital divide is crucial to ensure equal access to information and knowledge, as well as foster innovation and entrepreneurship.

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Goal 12: Responsible consumption and production image Goal 12: Responsible consumption and production

Achieving economic growth and sustainable development requires that we urgently reduce our ecological footprint by changing the way we produce and consume goods and resources. Agriculture is the biggest user of water worldwide, and irrigation now claims close to 70 percent of all freshwater for human use.

The efficient management of our shared natural resources, and the way we dispose of toxic waste and pollutants, are important targets to achieve this goal. Encouraging industries, businesses and consumers to recycle and reduce waste is equally important, as is supporting developing countries to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption by 2030.

A large share of the world population is still consuming far too little to meet even their basic needs.  Halving the per capita of global food waste at the retailer and consumer levels is also important for creating more efficient production and supply chains. This can help with food security, and shift us towards a more resource efficient economy.

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Goal 13: Climate action image Goal 13: Climate action

There is no country that is not experiencing the drastic effects of climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions are more than 50 percent higher than in 1990. Global warming is causing long-lasting changes to our climate system, which threatens irreversible consequences if we do not act.

The annual average economic losses from climate-related disasters are in the hundreds of billions of dollars. This is not to mention the human impact of geo-physical disasters, which are 91 percent climate-related, and which between 1998 and 2017 killed 1.3 million people, and left 4.4 billion injured. The goal aims to mobilize US$100 billion annually by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries to both adapt to climate change and invest in low-carbon development.

Supporting vulnerable regions will directly contribute not only to Goal 13 but also to the other SDGs. These actions must also go hand in hand with efforts to integrate disaster risk measures, sustainable natural resource management, and human security into national development strategies. It is still possible, with strong political will, increased investment, and using existing technology, to limit the increase in global mean temperature to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, aiming at 1.5°C, but this requires urgent and ambitious collective action.

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Goal 14: Life Below Water image Goal 14: Life Below Water

The world’s oceans – their temperature, chemistry, currents and life – drive global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind. How we manage this vital resource is essential for humanity as a whole, and to counterbalance the effects of climate change.

Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods. However, today we are seeing 30 percent of the world’s fish stocks overexploited, reaching below the level at which they can produce sustainable yields.

Oceans also absorb about 30 percent of the carbon dioxide produced by humans, and we are seeing a 26 percent rise in ocean acidification since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Marine pollution, an overwhelming majority of which comes from land-based sources, is reaching alarming levels, with an average of 13,000 pieces of plastic litter to be found on every square kilometre of ocean.

The SDGs aim to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems from pollution, as well as address the impacts of ocean acidification. Enhancing conservation and the sustainable use of ocean-based resources through international law will also help mitigate some of the challenges facing our oceans.

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Goal 15: Life on land image Goal 15: Life on land

Human life depends on the earth as much as the ocean for our sustenance and livelihoods. Plant life provides 80 percent of the human diet, and we rely on agriculture as an important economic resources. Forests cover 30 percent of the Earth’s surface, provide vital habitats for millions of species, and important sources for clean air and water, as well as being crucial for combating climate change.

Every year, 13 million hectares of forests are lost, while the persistent degradation of drylands has led to the desertification of 3.6 billion hectares, disproportionately affecting poor communities.

While 15 percent of land is protected, biodiversity is still at risk. Nearly 7,000 species of animals and plants have been illegally traded. Wildlife trafficking not only erodes biodiversity, but creates insecurity, fuels conflict, and feeds corruption.

Urgent action must be taken to reduce the loss of natural habitats and biodiversity which are part of our common heritage and support global food and water security, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and peace and security.

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Goal 17: Partnerships for the goals image Goal 17: Partnerships for the goals

The SDGs can only be realized with strong global partnerships and cooperation. Official Development Assistance remained steady but below target, at US$147 billion in 2017. While humanitarian crises brought on by conflict or natural disasters continue to demand more financial resources and aid. Many countries also require Official Development Assistance to encourage growth and trade.

The world is more interconnected than ever. Improving access to technology and knowledge is an important way to share ideas and foster innovation. Coordinating policies to help developing countries manage their debt, as well as promoting investment for the least developed, is vital for sustainable growth and development.

The goals aim to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation by supporting national plans to achieve all the targets. Promoting international trade, and helping developing countries increase their exports is all part of achieving a universal rules-based and equitable trading system that is fair and open and benefits all.

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Sustainable highlights on brand level

  • This indicates that the brand in a developed country operates with fair prices given to the producers of the product in developing countries.

  • This indicates that the brand has taken an active stand in relation to labour relations between workers and employers.

  • This indicates that the brand has actively sought out Fair Working Conditions for the producers of its product(s).

Product Lifecycle

Design

The Design Phase is a crucial part of determining a product’s sustainable capabilities. We’ve chosen to highlight a few genius steps that enable a sustainable product right from the beginning.

    Material & Material Extraction

    The materials used for a certain product and how these materials come to life are of crucial importance to the sustainable capabilities we seek in products.

      Transportation of Materials

      This step relates to the transportation of the raw materials from when they are first obtained (harvested etc.) to the production site. Obviously, the closer to the production site, the better.

        Production

        Obviously, the production of a certain product has an impact on the overall level of sustainability. Luckily, many manufacturers have now taken steps towards more sustainable production methods.

          Packaging

          How a brand chooses to package its products will have a significant influence of the carbon impact from packaging and transportation.

            Distribution

            This step relates to the distribution of products when they have been produced. Obviously, the closer to the brand’s warehouse, the better.

              Usage

              How you choose to use and take care of a product has a bigger impact than you think. Just think about how much longer a shirt lasts if it has been washed in the right way.

                End of life

                At this step, there is no way out and we have to find some way of discarding our product. How we discard a product will significantly influence the opportunity of reusing materials used.

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